about us

History

1993 – A group from the Cancer Institute Auxiliary started meeting and talking about a Cancer Support Center at UAMS.  They visited the Cancer Support Center in Fort Smith and were inspired.

Dr. Westbrook had visited with Sam Perroni (who was a founding member of the Ronald McDonald House and was president of the board) about an affordable housing facility for cancer patients and thought this would be a good partnership for the auxiliary.   

In 1999, Sam Perroni brought in several board members from the RMH (Dave Atkins, Brenda Barrett, Tammie Del Donno, Dr. Whit Hall, Rezy Mobarak, and Doug Wilson) and with the auxiliary group plus others, became incorporated as the Parents and Friends of Children and Adults, Inc.  The mission was to provide a shelter similar to the RMH for patients at UAMS Medical Center whose lives have been touched by cancer and parents of newborns in intensive care and to have a cancer support center for support groups and activities for the residents and other cancer patients.  To that end, fundraising and plans began.   It was and has been through the years, truly a leap of faith.

The doors opened to patients in January 2003 and the last 19 years Home for Healing has been a home away from home for over 5,000 patients, their caregivers, and parents of premature infants from every county in Arkansas, 35 states, and at least 7 foreign countries.

Ownership of Home for Healing – Non-profit 501(c)(3) home owned by the Board of Parents and Friends of Children and Adults, Inc. also known as the Home for Healing.

Fact Sheet

Financials and 990 upon request

Click here for our 2021 Fact Sheet

Upcoming Events

Board and staff

The Home for Healing, formerly the Family Home of Little Rock, is run by the board of Parents and Friends of Children and Adults, Inc. The Home is staffed by our House Manager, Ronnie Fehrenbach who oversees all daily operations. Our executive director is Kristin Trulock! The home is a spacious 13,500 square foot house with two guest wings: one has a kitchen, laundry, and five bedrooms and baths for parents who have babies in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) and the other has two kitchens, laundry and 10 bedrooms and baths for patients receiving cancer treatment and their caregivers. In addition to an office, conference room, meditation area, and manager’s apartment, the home also includes the Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Auxiliary Cancer Support Center comprised of a library and activities room, kitchen, covered porch and great room where functions for cancer patients are held.